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MS-Access query sort not working

Looked around on how to sort out a report properly as it was sorting on the wrong field (actually at first it did not even look like it was sorted at all, but I did not notice that other field was indeed sorted!)

The sort in a Query Report form (opposed to just an SQL query) is defined by the Group & Sort feature and not the SQL results. Actually, you most certainly don't need it in the SQL because otherwise you'll be sorting twice.

It took me a while, but I'm glad I found the solution. All the documentation I searched only talked about the wrong methods: use the Query sort ...

Check whether a form is open in MS-Access

MS-Access has forms, but no real means to know whether a form exists. It looks like you could go through the list of forms (Forms.item(i)) but I'm not too sure that would work in all circumstances.

Instead, I used code I found on another site which runs a system command to determine whether a form is currently attached to a window (has a state other than zero.)

The code looks like this:

IsLoaded = False
If SysCmd(acSysCmdGetObjectState, acForm, strFormName) <> 0 Then
    If Forms(strFormName).CurrentView <> 0 Then
        IsLoaded = True
    End If
End If

The first ...

MS-Access prints white pages

Problem

One of my customers changed a report and all of a sudden was getting an empty page for every other page (it will look like the last page in case you print a single page, but it really is every other page.)

Did you think about the margins?

When you create a report to be printed, you must define its size properly. So if you are printing 8"1/2 x 11" paper, you want to create a report that's exactly (to about 1/100th) the same size.

The total height must be 11" and the total width must be 8"1/2. However, the actual page that you create does NOT include the ...

MS-Access Report not printing

Reports, Print and Load() Event

I wrote many forms and in general everything works just fine.

In this case, I wanted to enter the data with a function so I could properly format several of the fields (especially the billing and shipping addresses.) That was done on the Load() event. That function working great when looking at the report from within MS-Access (on screen report). However, when directly sending the report to the printer, it was not working well at all.

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MS-Access: INSERT INTO syntax error

Today I was creating a report and created a table with a column named 'Group'. It looked like it worked just fine so I moved on with it.

Then, at the point I wanted to insert data with a simple INSERT INTO ... statement, it broke. The statement would generate a syntax error. Yes. The simple answer is that GROUP is viewed as a keyword and thus when used as a field name it needs to be escaped (i.e. written between backward quotes: `...`). Not liking the need to escape a field name each time I use it, I just renamed the field which is even better.

Report Sub-forms & their Recordset

Today I resolved a problem with setting up a sub-form recordset in a report.

In a form, you can do a lot of things, but reports are very much constrained. Most certainly because that way they are more sure that the data won't change while printing the report. But for sure, it is very annoying.

I got this error first:

"This feature is only available in an ADP"

In itself, that error means totally nothing. I have no clue what an ADP is. The solution to that error is available in Microsoft website here:

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  • number

    All software make use of numbers. Everything is a number. The most basic number in a computer is 0 or 1. This is called a bit. These are represented with electricity. Although in most cases we see it as 0 - Ground and 1 - Voltage (i.e. 1 volt), the bit representation in software and in hardware may be interpreted either way (i.e. a 0 could mean that the voltage is 1V and not 0V.)

    Combining these zeroes and ones we offer end users to handle much larger numbers. With 8 bits, you can have numbers from 0 to 255 (unsigned) or -128 to +127 (signed.) Now a day, computers can handle a much larger number of bits in one cycle. Most processors use 64 bits but they can calculate numbers on 128, 256, and for some 1024 bits at once. Also with parallelism, the size can be viewed as even larger (i.e. handling a 64 bit number in 1,536 threads like on my old nVidra Quadro 600 is equivalent to one large number of 98,304 bits! That would be 2 power 98,304 possibilitie or about 2.8359e+29592 in decimal.)

    Integers are easy to handle. Although when working on math problems you generally see the set of avaialble numbers as equivalent to N although mathematicians know that computers can really only handle a limited set of numbers. For example, on a 64 bit computer, the usual range is -9223372036854775808 to 9223372036854775807, This is generally enough although at times some equations have to be reworked to avoid really large or small intermediate numbers that work fine in math equations, but not so well on computers.

    Now, math also includes other sets of numbers such as D, R, and C. Computers do not offer any way to represent numbers in R or C but they can offer D to some extend. These numbers are called floating point numbers because we do math using an exponent. The exponent makes the decimal point "float" in any location as the number used for the exponent offers. Using a 64 bit floating point, you can have positive and negative numbers with precision varing betwee 10-308 and 10+308. This includes a positive zero (+0) and a negative zero (-0), which is import in a few cases (although +0 = -0 is true, you can get the sign of a number and distinguish both zeroes). Note that at first decimal numbers were going to also have a positive and negative zero, but it was instead decided to have one more negative number (remember, with 8 bits we have signed numbers from -128 to +127, this is because in the positive numbers we have a 0 which we don't have in the negative numbers.)