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Old Synergy 64bit version for windows compatible with Ubuntu synergy package version 1.4.12

As I like to have Synergy working on my Windows boxes (i.e. laptops), I am saving a copy of the installer 64 bit version which works fine with WinXP and Win7. I'm about to test it with Win10 which is likely to accept it as is too. Just in case you did not know, Synergy is a driver that takes one mouse device and makes it work on multiple computers. In other words, you can use any number of computers with one mouse and one keyboard. Move the mouse to the right computer and you can use the keyboard on that computer. No need for a KVM anymore (Keyboard Video Mouse device that allowed you to ...

Installing Solaris to compile your software

Now a day I like to install Solaris to check that my code compiles and generally runs under that OS.

I think that's a good way to prove that the code is multi-OS ready even if it is only for Unices.

OpenSolaris is free and can be downloaded from Oracle. The last URL I use was:

http://www.oracle.com/technetwork/server-storage/solaris11/downloads/index.html

The system, by default, comes with a directory named /usr/sfw which includes a really old version of gcc. It is possible, though, to move forward with a newer version of the compiler by installing a package. Under Solaris 11.2, this ...

Lost SSH key graphical prompt and auto-add to SSH agent

At some point in the past, my system somehow lost the ability to avoid asking me for my key every time I connect to one of my servers. It generally okay, I don't do so much work on that server that I'd have to connect all the time...

However, it is annoying when, once in while, I end up doing a lot of work, back and forth.

The ssh-agent was installed and working. I could add the key manually:

ssh-add ~/.ssh/my-secret-key
ssh-add -l

The ssh-add command allows you to add and remove keys from the ssh-agent. The -l command line option lists the keys currently held by the agent.

...

Checking integrity of a Debian installation

You can check that all the packages currently installed on a Debian system (i.e. Debian, Ubuntu, etc.) with many different tools.

Root Kits

I run rkhunter to verify for root kits.

Some hackers replace a well known command such as ls or cat with a version that takes over your computer by becoming root without your consent and then hacking your system in all sorts of ways. In most cases, just the feat of installing such a tool requires the hacker to already have root access, so it generally doesn't happen, but better safe than sorry!

File Changes

I use tripwire to verify that ...

Breaking TCP/IP with a simple client/server implementation in Qt

I've been working on a TCP/IP server/client with Qt and got a problem which I present in the attached package.

The example called tcp-bug. Start it with:

tcp-bug -s

in one console and then start the same command without the -s in another console:

tcp-bug

The client (this second tcp-bug without the -s) saves the file sent by the server in /tmp/out.html and it has to be exactly the same as the example.html file in the project. If not, then the transfer failed.

Most often, the transfer works so I wrote a script called many-hits.sh to run the client many times and test the result. ...

Verifying the md5sum of Installed Debian or Ubuntu packages

I always wondered why we couldn't just use dpkg to verify that the installed packages have not be tempered with. I know that the feature is hardly safe if the md5's are saved on the same computer, even the same hard drive...

Still, once in a while it's just a manual error that requires me to check that I did do something wrong on my computer.

Under Red Hat the rpm packager offers the -V option: Verify.

Under Debian and thus Ubuntu and other derivatives, the debsums tool has to be installed and used for that purpose.

  sudo apt-get install debsums
  debsums -s <package ...

A strange looking "The following packages have unmet dependencies" error!

I just upgraded an Ubuntu server from version 9.10 (Karmic Koala) to 10.04 (Lucid Lynx) and started getting a strange error about some package dependencies being unmet. I'm sure I did not intentionally install those packages, so as I was upgrading, I would imagine that they should have been removed automatically if required.

  # apt-get install <some-module>
  Reading package lists... Done
  Building dependency tree      
  Reading state information... Done
  You might want to run `apt-get -f install' to correct these:
  The following packages have unmet dependencies:

How to recompile a package on Ubuntu and install the new version.

I have a problem with a package that doesn't exactly do what I need it to do so I wanted to recompile it.

Here are the steps to take to get the source, modify it, recompile the new version, and finally install that new version.

WARNING

Before you start, make sure that you make a copy of all the current settings. The installation step is not unlikely going to overwrite any existing changes.

So... let's assume that the package was well done and thus that the author properly tested that all the necessary build development tools are specified on the corresponding line in the spec file

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